Greektown Casino Hotel Detroit: Bei HRS mit Gratis-Leistungen

Michigan Restaurant Reviews - Greektown, Hotel and Casino, in Detroit, Michigan - REVIEW

Michigan Restaurant Reviews - Greektown, Hotel and Casino, in Detroit, Michigan - REVIEW submitted by scoutingboard to Michigan [link] [comments]

Moving to Ohio, looking for a new casino

Got a promotion and being moved to another location in Ohio, near Ashland. My wife and I have enjoyed smaller casinos in SW Michigan. We've had the ability to bet low limits most of the time or drive an hour to Indiana were we can consistently find $5 tables.
I compiled a list of casinos within a 2 1/2 hour drive of us. Any information you can give would be helpful. If they don't have 5 dollar tables, do they have bubble craps? My wife mostly plays slots and carnival games.
MGM Northfield Park (slots only) - does this location have bubble craps? 1 hour drive
Jack Cleveland Casino. - Heard their minimums are $10, doesn't drop to 5. Do they have bubble craps? 1:05 drive.
Hollywood Casino Columbus - Heard their minimums are $10, doesn't drop to 5. Do they have bubble craps? 1:20 drive
Hollywood Casino Toldeo - I've been there on a weekday before 5 and seen $5 tables for poker and others. Wasn't a craps player then. What are their options? 1:47 drive
Mountaineer Casino - I haven't been to this place in 20 years. I don't remember much about it. 2:09 drive.
Wheeling Island Casino - I know they always have $5 craps with a firebet. I didn't get to look around much so I don't remember if there are bubble craps machines as well. 2:30 drive.
Greektown Casino - her parents live close to here. I think I've only been here to eat and play slots. Never played table games here. 2:38 drive.
Rivers Casino Pittsburgh - Heard their minimums are $10, doesn't drop to 5. Do they have bubble craps? 2:30 drive.
MGM Detroit - We thought about driving here to see her parents frequently and playing. We usually get offers from MGM to stay in Vegas (stayed at Luxor last time) and want to keep on their mailing list. I assume it's a $10 an up place. Maybe they have bubble craps? 2:30 drive.
Thanks for all of your help. I really enjoy craps, but my budget is usually $100, sometimes $200, so a $10 table doesn't work for me.
Thanks for all of the responses! Anything on Mountaineer Casino?
submitted by necrochaos to Craps [link] [comments]

Visitor's Guide to Red Wings hockey at Little Caesers Arena

It’s the inaugural season of the new Little Caesers Arena (LCA). Many pilgrims are making the trek to the new arena to watch the Detroit Red Wings play. This is my first version of this guide for first time visitors modeled after the one I put together for The Joe. I hope you find it helpful. Suggestions welcome!
Edit 1: typos and ride share info
Edit 2: photo spot location and photo
submitted by spoonyfork to DetroitRedWings [link] [comments]

Alternate History: Woodward gets his Way, An Essay on the Woodward Plan and what Detroit would be Like had the Plan been Implemented.

Leading Picture
https://i.imgur.com/tBFvwfh.jpg
Setting the Scene:
The year is 1805. Detroit has a population of about 1000 people and has only been a part of the United States for two years. Alas, it doesn't take long for things to go horribly wrong, as the entire city burns down this year. Judge Augustus Woodward, the first Judge of the Michigan Territory, creates an ambitious and unique plan to rebuild it.
Summary of what follows:
Ultimately, for various reasons, only a small fraction of Judge Woodward's grand plan was actually implemented. My goal is to attempt to see what Detroit would be like had the Woodward plan been fully carried out, as well as educate about the details of the plan and its history.
If you're just here for the pictures, here is a link to the complete album:
https://imgur.com/a/y5hLS
If you're still with me, without further ado, let's get started.
What was Woodward's plan?
I think it is best to show it in terms of what would change about Detroit as we know it, step by step:
https://imgur.com/a/LjTL1
Key Points of the Woodward Plan
This is nuts, how much of this was actually built?
I've highlighted the buildings that exist in the city today according to the following scheme:
First, here's the buildings on top of the existing street layout:
https://imgur.com/P2uQaD3
Now, replace that street layout with Woodward's:
https://imgur.com/JRYkclz
Finally, destroy the nonconforming buildings and replace them with conforming buildings:
https://imgur.com/ZOokpeJ
This plan seems crazy, where did Woodward get the idea from?
He was impressed and inspired by Washington D.C. and its diagonal avenues, but Woodward's plan takes it a step further. While Washington D.C. is simply a system of rectangular lots that happens to have diagonal avenues in it, the Woodward plan is a modular system entirely based on triangles that could be added as the city expanded.
Are you saying the spoke roads are not a part of the Woodward Plan?
Yes, this is a common misconception. The only relationship the spoke roads have to the Woodward plan is that they take roads that are part of the Woodward plan and extend them straight for ~40 miles.
Why was so little of the plan implemented?
Firstly, Woodward had limited authority to break up land that was already owned. For example, the government owned the area between Michigan Ave and Jefferson Ave and chose to arrange it in a conventional grid. Additionally, land in parcels perpendicular to the river owned by individuals, like the Brush family and the Beaubien family, could not be broken up and incorporated into the plan.
Secondly, drafting up a city plan takes time and the people of Detroit grew restless as time passed after the devastating fire. The public also disliked the idea of so much public park space. Coupled with a general resistance for change, emnity toward Woodward's plan grew, so much so that others in Michigan's government would try to undo it while he was away. On one such occurrence, Woodward's detractors authorized the land north of Grand Circus park to be sold in rectangular parcels. Despite Woodward's alarm and protests that such a maneuver was illegal, the sale went through in 1817. This killed hope of implementing any more of the Woodward Plan. Part of Woodward's written complaint was as follows: “Nature had destined the city of Detroit to be a great interior emporium, equal, if not superior, to any other on the surface of the … globe. … In such a case that art of man should aid the benevolence of the Creator, and no restricted attachment to the present day or to present interests should induce a permanent sacrifice of ulterior and brilliant prospects.”
And with that, Detroit's chance to develop as a truly one-of-a-kind city passed. The question of "what if" has reigned unchallenged ever since. Until now, that is. Working from Judge Woodward's original plans, I built the city street by street and building by building in Sketchup, creating "Woodward Detroit". I've included some famous Detroit buildings in Woodward Detroit, most of the rest are "filler" buildings meant to give the impression of a complete city. Now, I give you Detroit built per Woodward's own specifications.
Some Aerial Photos and the Skyline
https://imgur.com/tBFvwfh https://imgur.com/Yn4TJyc https://imgur.com/sVuvYse
Transit in Woodward Detroit
I see a lot of discussion around the subreddit about Detroit's transit woes so I did some thinking about transit, both from the present Detroit perspective of auto-dominance and an alternate rail and subway perspective.
Roads
Woodward could not have foreseen the explosive growth Detroit would see, eventually growing to a city of two million. I beilieve it is remarkable that he included 120' and 200' roads when designing the city in 1805; he showed remarkable foresight there that would lend itself well to Detroit's development as Motor City. However, I believe a limitation would show itself in the circle parks. Twelve roads all come together and you're stuck in a giant traffic circle. That sounds like a traffic nighmare.
On an interesting side note, there is nothing special about Woodward Avenue in Woodward Detroit. It isn't even a grand avenue. In present Detroit after the Woodward plan was defeated, people came along afterward and extended Fort, Michigan, Grand River, Woodward, Gratiot, and Jefferson into the "spokes" we know today. Ironically, the defeat of the Woodward Plan allowed Woodward to become a household name by having his name attached to the major thoroughfare of M-1.
While I have depicted the medians in the grand avenues as solid, there is no reason they couldn't be crossed with streets as they are presently on Washington Blvd, for example.
The layout of one way streets in the small Woodward portion of present Detroit gives a clue what the layout in Woodward Detroit could be like. The circle park road is one way, like a giant roundabout, then the outer concentric circular roads are also one way in alternating directions.
https://imgur.com/1dB9WLT
Writing my own fantasy history, we'll say that the parks contributed to traffic in Woodward Detroit becoming the worst in the country by the 1950s. Citizens of Woodward Detroit unified in such an uproar at the idea running highways through their unique city that the city was forced to look at more efficient ways of moving people...
Rail / Subway
The 200' wide grand avenues leave ample room for light rail in the medians, one track each way. However, unlike in present Detroit, where roads run dozens of miles without interruption, the grand avenues of Woodward Detroit are full of parks. One possible course of action is to use the Campus Martius style parks as stations and the Circle parks as interchanges for the trains.
https://imgur.com/WDPDvAz
A second option is more familiar: spokes. These lines could be on the surface or a subway system, but I call them "the subway" in the rest of the post, so we'll go with that. I like this spoke option because it solidifies Grand Circus park as the center of the city, with subway lines stretching out to the suburbs in a similar fashion to the spoke roads today. I don't know what the Grand Circus park station would look like, with the logistics of six subway lines all intersecting there, but I'm sure the result would be a marvel of the transit world. I chose to leave it to the imagination and have them all mash together, beacuse such a station is beyond my skill to create.
https://imgur.com/lCh1UWQ
Thirdly, the "why not both?" option ensures ample transit coverage.
https://imgur.com/sd5R4Z6
Now, with all of these lines, subways, and stations, it seems we need some way to move people around between them. Hence, the People Mover takes its place in Woodward Detroit. The People Mover can finally serve its intended purpose of moving people between different transit lines.
https://imgur.com/51MRHuq
Both sets of rail and the people mover create a robust transit system.
https://imgur.com/27WzjJ9
Looking at specific famous Detroit buildings / locations
Renaissance Center Since the unique part of the Woodward plan applies to only above Jefferson Ave, the Renaissance Center can stay exactly where it is in present Detroit.
https://imgur.com/VpLTfFZ
One Detroit Center, One Woodward Ave, McKinsey, Crowne Plaza
https://imgur.com/F4G5vis
Penobscot Building, Guardian Building, 211 Fort St.
https://imgur.com/OtgdTft
Campus Martius, First National Building, One Campus Martius, One Kennedy Square The first two buildings conform to the Woodward plan, One Kennedy Square was reshaped.
https://imgur.com/lXWFtS7
Monroe Block, First National, Cadillac Tower, Cadillac Square Cadillac Square is not a square any longer; instead it is just a part of Michigan Grand Ave. I've included a concept for the upcoming development on the Monroe block.
https://imgur.com/VoGyaiV
Hudson's Site Based upon the latest renderings, though the tower of apartments is more inspired by the first rendering. Standing 800' tall to its roof, this new skycraper is a focal point for present Detroit and Woodward Detroit alike.
https://imgur.com/z6NuGkB
View from top of David Whitney Building
https://imgur.com/9D9HaWA
Book Skyscraper In my made up history, the Woodward plan allowed Detroit's boom and surge to reach even greater heights before the Depression, enabling the construction of grand plans that were shelved in present Detroit because of the Depression. One such building is the 82 Story Book skyscraper attached to the Book Tower we know and love, standing about 900' tall!
https://imgur.com/27v3W27
Grand Circus Park Grand Circus Park would be quite a sight, to be standing in the center of the full circle with all twelve lots occupied by towers (though I didn't have the heart to remove the eternal parking lot at Adams and Madison (apparently now called Aretha Franklin Way)). In this alternate history, it is the transit hub of Detroit, served by six subway lines and the People Mover.
https://imgur.com/6hCgcTL
Water Board Building
https://imgur.com/VOHe101
Detroit Library
https://imgur.com/cssXTnA
Michigan Central Station
https://imgur.com/ntN6jHM https://imgur.com/MPXMKgi
Greektown / Casino
https://imgur.com/hQICX6D
Fisher Building
Another Detroit building that was prevented from reaching its full potential by the Depression. The Fisher Building we know today is less than a third of the original plan. You can read more about that in my post here: https://www.reddit.com/Detroit/comments/5vu97d/alternate_history_the_fisher_building_is_finished/?st=j89fj0h5&sh=928a4c31
In my alternate history, the Fisher brothers, seeking to cement their legacy with the largest commercial building in the world, finally convinced the city to allow the construction of their tower inside a circle park, ensuring that it is visible as the terminating vista on 12 streets. The Albert Kahn firm spared no expense and created a lavish limestone 60 story tower flanked by two 30 story towers, crowned by gold leaf roofs and all joined together by a U shaped, three-story lobby filled with decadent gold leaf, bronze, frescos, and murals. Finished just months before the 1929 Great Depression, it stands as a nationally-recognized high point of Art Deco architecture.
https://imgur.com/Bk17fXV
(Aside: How tall is it? There is a problem with the scale of the Fisher Building model. The width is correct at 800' and the footprint actually does just barely fit inside a circle park. However, the roof height (not including spire) of the 30 story part is 301' in the model while the actual roof height is 418.3'. Applying this scale factor would put the actual height of the 60 story roof at 938.3'.)
Riverfront Towers, Cobo, Joe Louis
https://imgur.com/v0WPDBn
Comerica Park and Ford Field
I experimented to see if these stadiums could fit inside circle parks.
https://imgur.com/AtGJUJR
https://imgur.com/g1n75ZF
Views
Aerial Views and Views from the tops of buildings
https://imgur.com/QyRFaqZ https://imgur.com/UE4TfN1 https://imgur.com/LpIYRNT https://imgur.com/NtHsBd8 https://imgur.com/U6D40h0 https://imgur.com/DhQs0Yl https://imgur.com/v7V2uz4 https://imgur.com/Wf6gOjm
Matched Photo
I attempted to match an aerial photo I found https://imgur.com/N7tf2lR http://banana1015.com/files/2016/03/Spencer-Platt-Getty-Images.jpg
Bonus
Woodward Detroit's one-of-a-kind layout has created a close knit city with an atmosphere like no other, with world leading architecture, innovation, and a robust transit system. Naturally, a certain tech company looking for their second HQ chose it as their first choice, claiming "there weren't ever really any other options." I had some fun making a circle park and its surrounding buildings into one unified HQ complex. And it does lie on one of the subway lines.
https://imgur.com/3lY5Rtn
Conclusion & Sources
For further reading about the history of the Woodward plan, I recommend this excellent three part article, from which I sourced much of my information:
http://detroiturbanism.blogspot.com/2016/04/the-woodward-plan-part-i-origins.html
Some information also came from here, a shorter summary focusing on the plan's downfall:
https://www.metrotimes.com/news-hits/archives/2015/06/01/the-detroit-that-never-was-how-the-woodward-plan-died-197-years-ago
In conclusion, once I learned about Woodward and his grand plan for Detroit, I voraciously devoured any information I could find about it. The combination of its true uniqueness among urban designs and the fact that just enough of the plan was built to stimulte curiousity but not enough to indicate what the whole city would look like sent me on this path. My goal was to create what Woodward could not and provide an alternate vision for what Detroit could have been. I greatly enjoyed following Woodward's own procedure to lay out a section and then populating with all the buildings and details. I am very pleased with the final results and hope you are too. I undertook this project out of passion and interest. I hope you enjoyed reading and that I arranged the content in a clear manner. Thanks for reading!
Acknowledgements
A wonderful tool in Sketchup is the ability to import models created by others. I used this to build more of a connection from my virtual Woodward Detroit to the Detroit we know today and I feel the results of my project would not have been even half as good without them. A big thank you to the following Sketchup users:
Also thank you to this reddit post; which fueled my inspiration for this project: https://www.reddit.com/MapPorn/comments/14qgyc/oc_my_map_of_the_1807_woodward_plan_for_the/?st=j89i5z1x&sh=62676319
submitted by mr_hemi to Detroit [link] [comments]

Updated List of things to Do - 2018 Edition

Happy New Year /Detroit! Every day people come to ask "What should I do in the city??" and this updated thread is our chance to tell them. It's been 3+ years since its been updated so a lot has changed. Keeping a similar format to the 2014 and 2011 editions comment below with any suggestion(s) and a short reason why you recommend it.
Everyone's collective picks will be added into the list below and then added to the sidebar. Closed businesses have already been removed, new Museums section now broken out, if you have any adds/deletes/edits to existing list, just shout it out, I'll leave this post as a sticky and open over the next week so all have a chance to contribute. See below:

Entertainment & Attractions

Public Spaces/Parks:
Entertainment Venues:
Seasonal:
Other:

Museums & Exhibits

  • Detroit Institute of Arts Free for Wayne, Oakland, and Macomb county residents.
  • Motown Museum the birthplace of Motown music, located in New Center
  • Henry Ford Museum/Greenfield Village Good for vistors if they have a few hours and transportation.
  • MOCAD Contemporary Art Museum in an amazing raw space, always changing exhibitions and a nice little shop inside. Located on Woodward in Midtown.
  • Michigan Science Center hands-on exhibits, IMAX Dome, Planetarium, mad scientists with liquid nitrogen and lightning. good for kids, located in Midtown.
  • Outdoor Adventure Center located in the newly restored Globe Trading Building.
  • Charles H. Wright Museum of African-American History
  • Tuskegee Airmen Museum
  • African Bead Museum
  • Dossin Great Lakes Museum located on Belle Isle
  • Ford Piquette Plant historic auto production facility and birthplace of the Model T.

Retail & Shopping

  • John K. King Books Downtown; Largest used bookstore in the state, located in an old glove warehouse
  • Pewabic Pottery near Islandview; Detroit original, lots of original ceramic art work to view and purchase
  • Third Man Records Retail store and Vinyl Manufacturing plant, owned/operated by Jack White
  • City Bird Midtown; Handmade goods from local and regional designers
  • People's Records Gratiot in Eastern Market; Internationally renowned treasure trove of rare vinyl, with a focus on Detroit produced stuff
  • Hello Records Corktown; Newer record shop with a great collection of new and old vinyl
  • Pure Detroit Downtown and New Center; Detroit themed t-shirts, magnets, etc.
  • Shinola Flagship Store watches, bikes and leather goods.
  • The Hub A Bicycle shop with a charitable bent and affordable bikes.
  • Avenue of Fashion Located at Livernois and Outer Drive; shopping district off the beaten path
  • Run Detroit Running gear store in Midtown, hosts a welcoming run club every Saturday morning at 8am
  • Paramita Sound Record store in West Village

Places to eat:

  • Coney Islands Lafayette or American, take your pick. Duly's Place in Mexicantown as another OG contender.
  • Supino Pizzeria Eastern Market; Best NY style pizza in the city, delicious fresh ingredients
  • Cass Cafe Restaurant and art gallery in Cass Corridor.
  • Green Dot Stables Grab your saddle, best sliders in the city.
  • Johnny Noodle King one of Detroit's ramen noodle houses
  • The Bronx Midtown. Classic dive bar with an equally classic jukebox and a burger that's out of this world.
  • Sweetwater Tavern Downtown, /Detroit's pick for 'Best Wings in the City'
  • Buddy's Pizza Original Detroit style pizza, well regarded by foodies and chefs.
  • Rock City Eatery on Woodward in Midtown. Cheap drinks and great food.
  • Dutch Girl Donuts Palmer Park. Best donuts in the city, been doing it the same way forever.
  • Mudgies Deli Corktown fresh sandwich shop with patio, recently expanded.
  • Cadieux Cafe Jazz music throughout the week and authentic Featherbowling.
  • Slow's BBQ Corktown. BBQ that put Corktown as a food destination on the map. Check out Slows-To-Go in Midtown if you're looking to skip the wait.
  • The Food Exchange famous for the Big Baby burger
  • Vincente's Great Cuban food. Salsa dancing. 20+ types of tequila
  • Ottava Via Italian joint in Corktown. Great food, laid back atmosphere.
  • Mercury Bar Good food and beer selection and the atmosphere is really cool.
  • Townhouse located Downtown
  • Bucharest Grill Amazing Shawarma and good prices, 3 locations around the city.
  • Scotty Simpson's Northwest side for fish and chips
  • Polish Village Cafe Eat your Polish Grandmother's cooking. A Hamtramck staple.
  • The Whitney Restaurant in a gorgeous historic mansion. Ambience is spectacular, food has gone through down periods. Good spot for an important date night. Don't be surprised to see a marriage proposal.
  • Giovanni's Arguably the best Italian food in the city. Neighborhood is what happens when you zone Heavy Industrial in Sim City, but the food, service and ambience are world-class.
  • London Chop House A famous Detroit restaurant name brought back to life, it's a classic dark-wood, old-school steakhouse. Frank Sinatra and Henry Ford II had tables there. Just opened a cigar bar in the same building for after-dinner lounging.
  • Roast "Iron Chef" Michael Symon's restaurant in the Westin Book Cadillac hotel. Things happen to meat here that you never thought possible.
  • Joe Muer's Seafood Like the London Chop House, a classic name from Detroit restaurant history brought back to life. Located in the ground floor of the GM Renaissance Center, lunch is comprised almost entirely of GM suppliers taking their customers out to lunch, but dinner is another matter.
  • Golden Fleece Greektown. "Best Gyro in town" and other greek specialties.
  • Mexicantown Most authentic Mexican food in the city, can't go wrong: Los Altos, Taqueria Lupitas, Taqueria Nuestra Familia, Taqueria El Rey, or Taqueria Mi Pueblo.
  • ** Takoi** Northern Thai inspired restaurant. James Beard finalist
  • Selden Standard Fine dining, local, small plates. Also great brunch.
  • Wright & Co Fine dining, local, small plates.
  • Republic Fine dining, local, small plates.
  • ima Corktown, Udon noodles.
  • Flower's of Vietnam Vietnamese restaurant run by a Lebanese chef in an old Mexicantown coney. Only in Detroit.
  • Polonia Restaurant Home style Polish and Eastern European food, located right next to Polish Village cafe in Hamtramck.
  • Apparatus Room Fine restaurant & bar in the Detroit Foundation Hotel near Cobo Center.
  • People's Bakery One of Southwest's finest local shops.

Brunch Spots

  • Cliff Bells Foxtown. Bottomless mimosas and bloody Mary's and great selection of French and Soul Food inspired dishes
  • Hudson Cafe Downtown. Red velvet pancakes, graham cracker-crusted French toast, and Voodoo Eggs Benedict
  • Seva Midtown. great Brunch for Vegan's and Vegetarian's- Small but good beewine selection
  • Brooklyn Street Local Corktown. banana pancakes with caramelized walnuts, an inevitably delicious quiche-of-the-day, and of course, the Hangover Special, and some damn good Poutine!
  • La Dolce Vita North Detroit. smooth jazz, salmon hash, and the shrimp Benedict make for a fabulous brunch experience
  • The Dime Store Downtown. a great selection of Omelets, Benedicts, Sandwiches, and Hash (from Executive Chef Josh, who has spent 2 decades in award winning restaraunts in Chicago, NYC, and A2) and of course, BOOZE! (Their Duck Rueben is out of this world)
  • Foran's Grand Trunk Pub Downtown. Great meal options throughout the day but their brunch is great (May I recommend their Corktown sandwich or the Lobster Benedict) with a great local beer selection to boot
  • Rose's Fine Foods Rivertown. Homesick for mom's cooking? This place has incredible baked goods and delicious sandwiches that make you feel right at home
  • The Clique Breakfast spot on Jefferson in Rivertown area
  • Honest Johns Midtown. Good all around menu, drink list and Chicken & Waffles.
  • Detroit Institute of Bagels Traditional bagels plus soups & sandwiches in an airy, industrial space with counter seating.

Places to drink:

Breweries:
  • Batch Brewing Co. Corktown small batch brewery with 15+ beers on tap and Louisiana-style food.
  • Detroit Beer Co. Great beer as well as great food. The Hair of the Dog burger is fantastic.
  • Atwater Detroit brewery near the Riverfront
  • Brew Detroit Contract brewing facility with a great open space and their own brews. Across the park from Batch. The Loaded Die hosts Tuesday boardgame nights here.
  • Eastern Market Brewing Company The large pink elephant mural is hard to miss.
  • Founders taproom Needs no introduction
  • Motor City Brewing Works Midtown; Microbrewery with delicious beer and uniquely-topped pizzas, rooftop seating in the Summer
  • Jolly Pumpkin Brewery Tap room specializing in Sour Beer and Ciders
Bars:
  • Motor City Wine located in Corktown.
  • SugarHouse Carefully crafted cocktails in a hunting lodge sharing a wall with Slow's. Hells yea.
  • Woodbridge Pub
  • Cafe D'Mongo's a unique and eclectic "speakeasy." reasonably priced and strong cocktails, live music every night (Fri & Sat only)
  • Cliff Bells a solid jazz club right downtown (could be under entertainment as well)
  • Dakota Inn Rathskeller a German underground beer hall that transports you straight to Europe, featuring German food, music, and beer. Especially popular during Oktoberfest (mid-September to end of October).
  • Jacoby's Biergarten good selection of draft beer, solid German food, and a huge international beer selection
  • Jolly Ol' Timers North Cass Corridor. If they're open, you won't find a bar full of more interesting people.
  • Old Miami Midtown. A Veterans bar, During the summer, the back yard is the best place to drink in the city.
  • Foran's Grand Trunk Pub Downtown; great selection of local Michigan beers, with decent food to accompany it
  • Northern Lights Lounge New Center bar with a great patio and decent food.
  • Two Way Inn One of the oldest bars in the city
  • The Skip Popular alley bar in The Belt
  • Ready Player One Barcarde
  • Checker BaOffworld Arcade Burger bar & Barcade near Campus Martius
Coffeeshops:
  • Astro Coffee a popular cafe in Corktown
  • Great Lakes Coffee Roasting Co. Chill coffee bar with beer, wine and some food.
  • Socre Tea A tea shop/cafe in midtown. Tucked away on Garfield and John R. Super quiet and relaxing.
  • Ashe Supply Co. Small-batch java drinks plus pastries, sandwiches and other goods just off Grand Circus Park in Downtown
  • Dessert Oasis Espresso, house-roasted coffee & pastries served in a brick-walled space with artwork & live music. Good window views located Downtown in Capital Park.

Landmarks

  • The Grand Lobbies of Detroit See here: http://imgur.com/a/tqC8i
  • Guardian Building another beautiful example of Art Deco architecture
  • Fisher Building "the worlds largest art project" and a prime example of Detroit's rich Art Deco history
  • The Fist of Joe Louis Woodward/Jefferson Ave
  • Ford Piquette Plant historic auto production facility and birthplace of the Model T.
  • The Spirit of Detroit Woodward/Jefferson Ave.
  • Hart Plaza Found along the Riverwalk; a public space that's home to Movement, Detroit Jazz Fest and other festivals throughout the year.
  • Senator Palmer’s Font Hill Log House and fountain in Palmer Park (when open).
submitted by sixwaystop313 to Detroit [link] [comments]

Visitor's Guide to Red Wings hockey at Joe Louis Arena

It’s the last season for Joe Louis Arena. Many pilgrims are making the trek to the Hockeytown holy ground to watch the Detroit Red Wings play. I’ve posted this guide over the years for first time visitors to the Joe. I hope you find it helpful. Suggestions welcome!
Edit 1: added a section about safety.
Edit 2: added sections on tours and inclement weather.
Edit 3: updates and clarifications.
Edit 4: updated Windsor Tunnel bus link
submitted by spoonyfork to DetroitRedWings [link] [comments]

Does anyone play regularly in Michigan? What are the best spots to play?

I made a list of casinos within a 5 hour circle from me. I have no way of determining if any are utilizing CSM's or are still fully playable houses. I'm hoping the bulk of these are still tried and true places I can work on my counting practice. I recently took a road trip passed the UP and into Ontario but all of the Ontario casinos employ CSMs very reliably (that I've seen so far on my last business trip) so that whole area is out. Plus, there aren't nearly as many casinos so densely compacted like there are in Michigan.
I thought I'd simply dump'em here and see if anyone has experience at these places.
Northern and Central MI has a shitload of casinos. I'm new to the state so I haven't been to a single one of these yet but I'm going to start checking them out hopefully in a couple months once I'm settled in and figure out my bankroll situation.
The only house I've heard any feedback from is Turtle Creek in Traverse City and that it's an excellent place to play.
Thanks;
submitted by gulsadei to blackjack [link] [comments]

An Essay on the Woodward Plan for Detroit, One of the Most Ambitious and Unique City Plans (x-post /r/Detroit)

Leading Picture
https://i.imgur.com/tBFvwfh.jpg
Setting the Scene:
The year is 1805. Detroit has a population of about 1000 people and has only been a part of the United States for two years. Alas, it doesn't take long for things to go horribly wrong, as the entire city burns down this year. Judge Augustus Woodward, the first Judge of the Michigan Territory, creates an ambitious and unique plan to rebuild it.
Summary of what follows:
Ultimately, for various reasons, only a small fraction of Judge Woodward's grand plan was actually implemented. My goal is to attempt to see what Detroit would be like had the Woodward plan been fully carried out, as well as educate about the details of the plan and its history.
If you're just here for the pictures, here is a link to the complete album:
https://imgur.com/a/y5hLS
If you're still with me, without further ado, let's get started.
What was Woodward's plan?
I think it is best to show it in terms of what would change about Detroit as we know it, step by step:
https://imgur.com/a/LjTL1
Key Points of the Woodward Plan
This is nuts, how much of this was actually built?
I've highlighted the buildings that exist in the city today according to the following scheme:
First, here's the buildings on top of the existing street layout:
https://imgur.com/P2uQaD3
Now, replace that street layout with Woodward's:
https://imgur.com/JRYkclz
Finally, destroy the nonconforming buildings and replace them with conforming buildings:
https://imgur.com/ZOokpeJ
This plan seems crazy, where did Woodward get the idea from?
He was impressed and inspired by Washington D.C. and its diagonal avenues, but Woodward's plan takes it a step further. While Washington D.C. is simply a system of rectangular lots that happens to have diagonal avenues in it, the Woodward plan is a modular system entirely based on triangles that could be added as the city expanded.
Are you saying the spoke roads are not a part of the Woodward Plan?
Yes, this is a common misconception. The only relationship the spoke roads have to the Woodward plan is that they take roads that are part of the Woodward plan and extend them straight for ~40 miles.
Why was so little of the plan implemented?
Firstly, Woodward had limited authority to break up land that was already owned. For example, the government owned the area between Michigan Ave and Jefferson Ave and chose to arrange it in a conventional grid. Additionally, land in parcels perpendicular to the river owned by individuals, like the Brush family and the Beaubien family, could not be broken up and incorporated into the plan.
Secondly, drafting up a city plan takes time and the people of Detroit grew restless as time passed after the devastating fire. The public also disliked the idea of so much public park space. Coupled with a general resistance for change, emnity toward Woodward's plan grew, so much so that others in Michigan's government would try to undo it while he was away. On one such occurrence, Woodward's detractors authorized the land north of Grand Circus park to be sold in rectangular parcels. Despite Woodward's alarm and protests that such a maneuver was illegal, the sale went through in 1817. This killed hope of implementing any more of the Woodward Plan. Part of Woodward's written complaint was as follows: “Nature had destined the city of Detroit to be a great interior emporium, equal, if not superior, to any other on the surface of the … globe. … In such a case that art of man should aid the benevolence of the Creator, and no restricted attachment to the present day or to present interests should induce a permanent sacrifice of ulterior and brilliant prospects.”
And with that, Detroit's chance to develop as a truly one-of-a-kind city passed. The question of "what if" has reigned unchallenged ever since. Until now, that is. Working from Judge Woodward's original plans, I built the city street by street and building by building in Sketchup, creating "Woodward Detroit". I've included some famous Detroit buildings in Woodward Detroit, most of the rest are "filler" buildings meant to give the impression of a complete city. Now, I give you Detroit built per Woodward's own specifications.
Some Aerial Photos and the Skyline
https://imgur.com/tBFvwfh https://imgur.com/Yn4TJyc https://imgur.com/sVuvYse
Transit in Woodward Detroit
I see a lot of discussion around the Detroit subreddit about Detroit's transit woes so I did some thinking about transit, both from the present Detroit perspective of auto-dominance and an alternate rail and subway perspective.
Roads
Woodward could not have foreseen the explosive growth Detroit would see, eventually growing to a city of two million. I beilieve it is remarkable that he included 120' and 200' roads when designing the city in 1805; he showed remarkable foresight there that would lend itself well to Detroit's development as Motor City. However, I believe a limitation would show itself in the circle parks. Twelve roads all come together and you're stuck in a giant traffic circle. That sounds like a traffic nighmare.
On an interesting side note, there is nothing special about Woodward Avenue in Woodward Detroit. It isn't even a grand avenue. In present Detroit after the Woodward plan was defeated, people came along afterward and extended Fort, Michigan, Grand River, Woodward, Gratiot, and Jefferson into the "spokes" we know today. Ironically, the defeat of the Woodward Plan allowed Woodward to become a household name by having his name attached to the major thoroughfare of M-1.
While I have depicted the medians in the grand avenues as solid, there is no reason they couldn't be crossed with streets as they are presently on Washington Blvd, for example.
The layout of one way streets in the small Woodward portion of present Detroit gives a clue what the layout in Woodward Detroit could be like. The circle park road is one way, like a giant roundabout, then the outer concentric circular roads are also one way in alternating directions.
https://imgur.com/1dB9WLT
Writing my own fantasy history, we'll say that the parks contributed to traffic in Woodward Detroit becoming the worst in the country by the 1950s. Citizens of Woodward Detroit unified in such an uproar at the idea running highways through their unique city that the city was forced to look at more efficient ways of moving people...
Rail / Subway
The 200' wide grand avenues leave ample room for light rail in the medians, one track each way. However, unlike in present Detroit, where roads run dozens of miles without interruption, the grand avenues of Woodward Detroit are full of parks. One possible course of action is to use the Campus Martius style parks as stations and the Circle parks as interchanges for the trains.
https://imgur.com/WDPDvAz
A second option is more familiar: spokes. These lines could be on the surface or a subway system, but I call them "the subway" in the rest of the post, so we'll go with that. I like this spoke option because it solidifies Grand Circus park as the center of the city, with subway lines stretching out to the suburbs in a similar fashion to the spoke roads today. I don't know what the Grand Circus park station would look like, with the logistics of six subway lines all intersecting there, but I'm sure the result would be a marvel of the transit world. I chose to leave it to the imagination and have them all mash together, beacuse such a station is beyond my skill to create.
https://imgur.com/lCh1UWQ
Thirdly, the "why not both?" option ensures ample transit coverage.
https://imgur.com/sd5R4Z6
Now, with all of these lines, subways, and stations, it seems we need some way to move people around between them. Hence, the People Mover takes its place in Woodward Detroit. The People Mover can finally serve its intended purpose of moving people between different transit lines.
https://imgur.com/51MRHuq
Both sets of rail and the people mover create a robust transit system.
https://imgur.com/27WzjJ9
Looking at specific famous Detroit buildings / locations
Renaissance Center Since the unique part of the Woodward plan applies to only above Jefferson Ave, the Renaissance Center can stay exactly where it is in present Detroit.
https://imgur.com/VpLTfFZ
One Detroit Center, One Woodward Ave, McKinsey, Crowne Plaza
https://imgur.com/F4G5vis
Penobscot Building, Guardian Building, 211 Fort St.
https://imgur.com/OtgdTft
Campus Martius, First National Building, One Campus Martius, One Kennedy Square The first two buildings conform to the Woodward plan, One Kennedy Square was reshaped.
https://imgur.com/lXWFtS7
Monroe Block, First National, Cadillac Tower, Cadillac Square Cadillac Square is not a square any longer; instead it is just a part of Michigan Grand Ave. I've included a concept for the upcoming development on the Monroe block.
https://imgur.com/VoGyaiV
Hudson's Site Based upon the latest renderings, though the tower of apartments is more inspired by the first rendering. Standing 800' tall to its roof, this new skycraper is a focal point for present Detroit and Woodward Detroit alike.
https://imgur.com/z6NuGkB
View from top of David Whitney Building
https://imgur.com/9D9HaWA
Book Skyscraper In my made up history, the Woodward plan allowed Detroit's boom and surge to reach even greater heights before the Depression, enabling the construction of grand plans that were shelved in present Detroit because of the Depression. One such building is the 82 Story Book skyscraper attached to the Book Tower we know and love, standing about 900' tall!
https://imgur.com/27v3W27
Grand Circus Park Grand Circus Park would be quite a sight, to be standing in the center of the full circle with all twelve lots occupied by towers (though I didn't have the heart to remove the eternal parking lot at Adams and Madison (apparently now called Aretha Franklin Way)). In this alternate history, it is the transit hub of Detroit, served by six subway lines and the People Mover.
https://imgur.com/6hCgcTL
Water Board Building
https://imgur.com/VOHe101
Detroit Library
https://imgur.com/cssXTnA
Michigan Central Station
https://imgur.com/ntN6jHM https://imgur.com/MPXMKgi
Greektown / Casino
https://imgur.com/hQICX6D
Fisher Building
Another Detroit building that was prevented from reaching its full potential by the Depression. The Fisher Building we know today is less than a third of the original plan. You can read more about that in my post here: https://www.reddit.com/Detroit/comments/5vu97d/alternate_history_the_fisher_building_is_finished/?st=j89fj0h5&sh=928a4c31
In my alternate history, the Fisher brothers, seeking to cement their legacy with the largest commercial building in the world, finally convinced the city to allow the construction of their tower inside a circle park, ensuring that it is visible as the terminating vista on 12 streets. The Albert Kahn firm spared no expense and created a lavish limestone 60 story tower flanked by two 30 story towers, crowned by gold leaf roofs and all joined together by a U shaped, three-story lobby filled with decadent gold leaf, bronze, frescos, and murals. Finished just months before the 1929 Great Depression, it stands as a nationally-recognized high point of Art Deco architecture.
https://imgur.com/Bk17fXV
(Aside: How tall is it? There is a problem with the scale of the Fisher Building model. The width is correct at 800' and the footprint actually does just barely fit inside a circle park. However, the roof height (not including spire) of the 30 story part is 301' in the model while the actual roof height is 418.3'. Applying this scale factor would put the actual height of the 60 story roof at 938.3'.)
Riverfront Towers, Cobo, Joe Louis
https://imgur.com/v0WPDBn
Comerica Park and Ford Field
I experimented to see if these stadiums could fit inside circle parks.
https://imgur.com/AtGJUJR
https://imgur.com/g1n75ZF
Views
Aerial Views and Views from the tops of buildings
https://imgur.com/QyRFaqZ https://imgur.com/UE4TfN1 https://imgur.com/LpIYRNT https://imgur.com/NtHsBd8 https://imgur.com/U6D40h0 https://imgur.com/DhQs0Yl https://imgur.com/v7V2uz4 https://imgur.com/Wf6gOjm
Matched Photo
I attempted to match an aerial photo I found https://imgur.com/N7tf2lR http://banana1015.com/files/2016/03/Spencer-Platt-Getty-Images.jpg
Bonus
Woodward Detroit's one-of-a-kind layout has created a close knit city with an atmosphere like no other, with world leading architecture, innovation, and a robust transit system. Naturally, a certain tech company looking for their second HQ chose it as their first choice, claiming "there weren't ever really any other options." I had some fun making a circle park and its surrounding buildings into one unified HQ complex. And it does lie on one of the subway lines.
https://imgur.com/3lY5Rtn
Conclusion & Sources
For further reading about the history of the Woodward plan, I recommend this excellent three part article, from which I sourced much of my information:
http://detroiturbanism.blogspot.com/2016/04/the-woodward-plan-part-i-origins.html
Some information also came from here, a shorter summary focusing on the plan's downfall:
https://www.metrotimes.com/news-hits/archives/2015/06/01/the-detroit-that-never-was-how-the-woodward-plan-died-197-years-ago
In conclusion, once I learned about Woodward and his grand plan for Detroit, I voraciously devoured any information I could find about it. The combination of its true uniqueness among urban designs and the fact that just enough of the plan was built to stimulte curiousity but not enough to indicate what the whole city would look like sent me on this path. My goal was to create what Woodward could not and provide an alternate vision for what Detroit could have been. I greatly enjoyed following Woodward's own procedure to lay out a section and then populating with all the buildings and details. I am very pleased with the final results and hope you are too. I undertook this project out of passion and interest. I hope you enjoyed reading and that I arranged the content in a clear manner. Thanks for reading!
Acknowledgements
A wonderful tool in Sketchup is the ability to import models created by others. I used this to build more of a connection from my virtual Woodward Detroit to the Detroit we know today and I feel the results of my project would not have been even half as good without them. A big thank you to the following Sketchup users:
Also thank you to this reddit post; which fueled my inspiration for this project: https://www.reddit.com/MapPorn/comments/14qgyc/oc_my_map_of_the_1807_woodward_plan_for_the/?st=j89i5z1x&sh=62676319
submitted by mr_hemi to urbanplanning [link] [comments]

Things to do in Detroit - Once and for all, again.

Alright its been 3+ years since we created Detroit's official sidebar "list of things to do" and a lot has changed. People keep asking so let's give it another go. I'll leave this post as a sticky for the next week so everyone's brains can stew over the best of the best in the city.
Keeping the same format as last time, comment with your suggestion(s) and a short reason why you would recommend it. Everyone's collective picks will be added into the list below.
Places to eat:
Brunch Spots
Places to drink:
  • Great Lakes Coffee Roasting Co. Chill coffee bar with beer, wine and some food.
  • Socre Tea A tea shop/cafe in midtown. Tucked away on Garfield and John R. Super quiet and relaxing.
  • Park Bar Downtown; Great beer selection, beautiful windows, delicious shwarma and curly fries from the Bucharest Grill next door
  • Motor City Wine located in Corktown.
  • PJ's Lager House live music, local beer on tap
  • Woodbridge Pub
  • Detroit Beer Co. Great beer as well as great food. The Hair of the Dog burger is fantastic.
  • SugarHouse Carefully crafted cocktails in a hunting lodge sharing a wall with Slow's. Hells yea.
  • Cafe D'Mongo's a unique and eclectic "speakeasy." reasonably priced and strong cocktails, live music every night (Fri & Sat only)
  • Cliff Bells a solid jazz club right downtown (could be under entertainment as well)
  • Dakota Inn Rathskeller a German underground beer hall that transports you straight to Europe, featuring German food, music, and beer. Especially popular during Oktoberfest (mid-September to end of October).
  • Jacoby's Biergarten good selection of draft beer, solid German food, and a huge international beer selection
  • Astro Coffee a popular cafe in Corktown
  • Foran's Grand Trunk Pub great selection of local Michigan beers, with decent food to accompany it
  • Old Miami Inexpensive drinks in your uncle's basement. On Cass in southern midtown.
  • Zenith Cuban/mexican fusion in new center, in the Fisher Building. Also they have a tiki bar.
  • Jolly Ol' Timers North Cass Corridor. If they're open, you won't find a bar full of more interesting people.
  • Old Miami Midtown. A Veterans bar, During the summer, the back yard is the best place to drink in the city.
Retail & Shopping:
  • City Bird Midtown; Handmade goods from local and regional designers
  • John K. King Books Downtown; Largest used bookstore in the state, located in an old glove warehouse
  • People's Records Midtown; Internationally renowned treasure trove of rare vinyl, with a focus on Detroit produced stuff
  • Hello Records Corktown; Newer record shop with a great collection of new and old vinyl
  • Pure Detroit Downtown and New Center; Detroit themed t-shirts, magnets, etc.
  • Shinola Flagship Store watches, bikes and leather goods.
  • Pewabic Pottery lots of original ceramic art work to view and purchase
  • The Hub A Bicycle shop with a charitable bent and affordable bikes.
  • Livernois and Outer Drive shopping district off the beaten path
Entertainment & Attractions
  • Belle Isle
  • Detroit Institute of Arts Free for Wayne, Oakland, and Macomb county residents. Concerts every Friday night in the Rivera Court (probably one of the most fantastic and important pieces of public art in the world). Just for the atmosphere alone it's worth going, and the music is generally great as well.
  • Detroit Film Theatre 1,200 seat auditorium located at the DIA, catch a screening.
  • Riverwalk a walkable view of Canada and Detroit River
  • Casinos we have three! Greektown, MGM Grand and Motor City.
  • Motown Museum New Center; Studio tours of the houses, really cool stuff.
  • MOCAD Midtown; Contemporary art museum in an amazing raw space, always changing exhibitions and a nice little shop inside.
  • Detroit City Football Club amazing soccer team, nationally recognized.
  • Detroit Derby Girls at the Masonic Temple
  • Garden Bowl/Magic Stick bowling alley, bar and concert venue under one roof.
  • Stadiums Ford Field, Comerica Park, Joe Louis Arena
  • Theaters Detroit is home to the second largest theater district in the Fillmore, Fox Theater, Masonic Temple, Fisher Theater, Gem, Music Hall, St. Andrews, Detroit Opera House, City Theater, Majestic, Max M. Fisher Music Center
  • Detroit People Mover it's not the most useful system for transit, but is actually a good way to see downtown in a quick 20-30 minutes
  • Eastern Market one of the largest and oldest open-air farmers markets in the country
  • Baker's Keyboard Lounge top-notch jazz club
  • Movement Festival worldwide-recognized annual Electronic music festival held every Memorial Day Weekend
  • Detroit Jazz Festival largest free jazz festival in the world (self-proclaimed, at least) held every Labor Day Weekend
  • Detroit Beer Festival one of four Michigan Brewers Guild annual festivals held the last weekend of October
  • Campus Martius highly regarded as one of the best city parks in the country and home to many events throughout the year. Home to Detroit's Christmas tree and an ice-skating rink in the winter.
  • Michigan Science Center hands-on exhibits, IMAX Dome, Planetarium, mad scientists with liquid nitrogen and lightning. good for kids, located in Midtown.
  • Charles H. Wright Museum of African-American History
  • Tuskegee Airmen Museum
  • Rouge Park for great outdoor times
  • Chandler Park
  • Historic Fort Wayne when open
  • African Bead Museum
  • Outdoor Adventure Center located in the newly restored Globe Trading Building,
  • Dakota Inn Rathskeller Oktoberfest Six Mile and Woodward-ish. One of the coolest activities in all of Detroit, somehow unknown even among hardcore Detroiters.
Landmarks
  • The Grand Lobbies of Detroit See here: http://imgur.com/a/tqC8i
  • The Fist of Joe Louis Woodward/Jefferson Ave
  • Fisher Building "the worlds largest art project" and a prime example of Detroit's rich Art Deco history
  • Guardian Building another beautiful example of Art Deco architecture
  • Ford Piquette Plant historic auto production facility and birthplace of the Model T.
  • The Spirit of Detroit Woodward/Jefferson Ave.
  • Hart Plaza
  • Senator Palmer’s Font Hill Log House and fountain in Palmer Park (when open).
  • Son House in Mt. Hazel Cemetary for the music historian.
  • Tigers Stadium field located at Trumbull & Michigan Ave. walk the grounds at the former playing field for Detroit Tigers.
Edit #1: Added most of the suggestions from the comments already- but still a lot to get through! If you have descriptions, or tips for any of the places listed or would like to add more, just leave it below
Edit #2: I've been slacking on the updates- but officially replaced the list in the sidebar! Will work on adding everyones in coming days. stay tuned.
submitted by sixwaystop313 to Detroit [link] [comments]

FRIDAY CALL TO ACTION: We need your help in Michigan Reddit!

Ok Reddit, Grassroots Leadership in Michigan is making our final push to put pressure on our Superdelegates to vote along with their constituents who chose Sanders over Hillary. At the very least, we are asking them to pledge to vote proportionally with our state's voters. Right now, we are not getting much reception from them, so we need SandersforPresident to give our Superdelegates the Reddit Hug of Death, flooding all of their offices with calls on Friday, the 25th of March (today). We need to put the pressure in advance for the Saturday, April 2nd Superdelegate Meeting at the Greektown Casino in Detroit. This meeting IS open to the public, and we're looking to flood it with Sanders supporters, so if you live in Michigan, or even nearby Toledo, mark April 2nd at 10 am off on your calendar to stand with us. We are looking for 500 - 1000 Bernie Supporters to show up and demand that our Superdelegates stand with their constituents. We'll post more instruction on this in /Michigan4Sanders next week!
Here's the phone script and the phone numbers. Please call as many as you can (or all of them for super awesome bonus points;). We put all of their numbers so that if the line you call is busy, you can call another office.
Script for calling offices of Super Delegates
Hi I’m calling to leave an opinion for (Insert Super Delegate name here). Michigan Grassroots for Bernie has created a pledge for all 17 Michigan Superdelegates to sign saying they commit to casting their Superdelegate vote at the convention in Philadelphia in July for whichever democratic candidate has more pledged delegates after the primaries are finished. I think it’s important for the American people to decide who the nominee is rather than a few party officials. For more info about the pledge or in order to sign it you can contact the Michigan Grassroots for Bernie leaders who will be also be contacting your office and leaving their information for you. I hope that in the interest of a fair and Democratic Party nomination process you decide to sign this pledge.
(If you’re not from Michigan or even the area the superdelegate you’re calling represents DO NOT LEAVE ANY PERSONAL OR CONTACT INFO. Feel free to leave this info if you live in the area they represent, but don’t feel obligated to.
These are the Superdelegates we are focusing on today while we hammer down the contact info for the remaining Superdelegates.
Debbie Stabenow: Senior Senator Lansing: 517-203-1760 Grand Rapids: 616-975-0052 Flint: 810-720-4172 Traverse City: 231-929-1031 Detroit: 313-961-4330 Marquette: 906-228-8756 Washington D.C: 202-224-4822
Gary Peters: Junior Senator Detroit: 313-226-6020, Lansing: 517-377-1508 Grand Rapids: 616-233-9150 Rochester: 248-608-8040 Saginaw: 989-754-0112 Traverse City: 231-947-7773 Washington D.C: 202-224-6221
Brenda Lawrence: 14th District Rep Washington D.C.: 202-225-5802 Detroit: 313-423-6183 Southfield: 248-356-2052
Dan Kildee 5th District Rep Washington D.C.: 202-225-3611 Flint: 810-238-8627 Campaign: 810-309-9027
Debbie Dingell: 12th District Rep Washington D.C.: 202-225-4071 Dearborn: 313-278-2936 Ypsilanti: 734-481-1100
John Conyers: 13th District Rep Washington D.C.: 202-225-5126 Detroit: 313-961-5670 Westland: 734-675-4084
Sander Levin: 9th District Rep Washington D.C.: 888-810-3880 Washington D.C. General: 202-225-4961 Michigan Office: 586-498-7122
Nancy Quarles: Oakland County Commissioner General Office: 248-858-0100
submitted by MiShirtGuy to SandersForPresident [link] [comments]

Going to the Game in Detroit?

If you have a chance to come Detroit, I highly recommend:
Breakfast - The Original Pancake House pretty good breakfast, but still nothing compares to an Eat 'n Park breakfast buffet.
Lunch - Vinsetta Garage has excellent food and drink selection. Isn't that far from the Detroit Zoo or downtown.
Dinner - Slow's BBQ it's heavenly, but in a shitty neighborhood of Detroit. Most say it's worth it.
Dessert - Astoria Pastry Shop for the best God Blessed Baklava you'll ever have in your life.
Drink - Michigan is known for their micro-brew selection. One that is on par with Yuengling as far as best cost-to-taste ratio would be Bell's Two Hearted Ale
Non-Gameday Entertainment - Erebus Haunted House is the best Haunted House in all of Michigan. Highly recommend it if you're in the area.
Gameday Entertainment - Any of the casino's (Greektown, Motor City, etc.) are a good way to spend your day and also have decent food.
Parting words of advice - Don't wear any Penguins or Sydney Crosby gear. The hate and butt-hurt for this is very real in Michigan.
submitted by UniBrow64 to steelers [link] [comments]

Things to do in the Motor City

THINGS TO DO IN DETROIT, MICHIGAN Established in 1801 Detroit was home to many Indian tribes that you can see with some of the neighboring cities names and the best things I can say about a visit to the Motor City are it’s historical values. There are many places to visit and each one of them has lots of history behind it. If you travel up interstate 75 north for several hours you will come across many Indian reservations that they were awarded by the government for the effect they had on building this nation. Sports Teams You can begin with Joe Lewis Arena the home of the Detroit Red Wings since 1979 they recently opened Little Caesars Arena in September 2017, which is the home of the Detroit Pistons and the Red Wings. As you walk south down the famed Woodward Ave you will see the Home of the Detroit Tigers Comerica Park and just around the corner is Ford Field the Home of the Detroit Lions. In early 2018, all four major sports teams reunited back in Detroit for the first time in nearly 25 years, which has brought millions in revenue back to the Motor City. Theaters Further across the street you will see The World Famous Fox Theater, which has been a stage for many of the past and present superstar performers. It is the host to lots of thing such as, comedy shows, concerts, and kid events. Just about every entertainer from every generation has performed in this theater. Gambling Detroit is also the largest inner city that has legalized gambling. They have three hotel casinos, The Motor City, Greektown, and the MGM Grand casino. You can relax at either one of these resorts and have a great meal, place a bet, get a massage, listen to live music, or just mingle among the fabulous crowds that gather at any of these venues on a daily basis. Museums You can view first hand the lab where Tomas Edison had his first light bulb moment or even the workshop where the Wright Brothers reached the sky. These are some of the features of Greenfield Village. The facilities are over 80 acres wide with shops, dining, and events. Henry Ford Museum is another one of the attractions of The Metro Detroit area it has artifacts, exhibits, and some of the greatest innovations in American History. They have daily tours that include a guide through the Rouge Ford Factory. You get to see first hand Ford Trucks being made from the ground up until they roll off the assembly line and stored to be transported to dealers around the world. You can even view the first Model T or jump on a steam-powered locomotive to visit animals around the compounds. There's the Detroit Institute of Arts you can visit to see Priceless works of art. The Michigan Science center, the Charles H Wright Museum are two other museums in metro Detroit that house many works of art. Last but not least you have to visit the Motown Museum where all of the Motown artists started their entertainment lives. Berry Gordy is one of the most famous names in the world of music and he started his label right there on West Grand Blvd. in the heart of Detroit. Some of the artists that started there were Stevie Wonder, The Supremes, The Jackson Five, and The Four Tops. There are daily tours that take you into this historic building to see where these sounds all began. Restaurants The first class dining in Detroit is one of my favorite parts of the city. You can start off by strolling to Mexican town just down interstate 75 South to Clark Street. Or you can head to the downtown area to Greektown and enjoy some of the best Greek cuisine in the world. Once again there’s the three casinos where you can have breath taking meals at also. In my opinion I would say that there are great places you can dine at after nearly every turn of the steering wheel in Detroit. Image Most of all I was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan. I have resided in the same home since I was four years old and every one of those years have had it’s share of ups and downs, but I wouldn’t trade those experiences for anything in the world. This city has taught me so much about growing into a man and how to turn a negative into a positive. The men and women of Detroit each have a saying that to do anything means that it must be done correctly and this applies to every part of life. Detroit is full of blue-collar workers that go into the factories of Ford Motor, General Motors, and Chrysler on a daily basis and has helped to build this country into what it is today. Each one of these motor companies have a slogan that has Detroit in it's saying. Starting with Chrysler's "Imported from Detroit", General Motors "Detroit's Strong as a Rock", and finally Ford's "Detroit Raises the Bar". A few years ago, when President Obama was in office the three auto companies got into a financial jam and they were bailed out by Obama's Administration to save these American jobs. That turned out to be one of the best things that any modern day President could have done. He was apposed with strong opposition from most Republicans in office, but at the end of the day the loans were paid back and in record time by all three auto companies. Best of all those factory workers jobs were saved by this action and the Motor City was kept alive, well, and still prospering because of this action by a revolutionary President.
submitted by davhoods007 to u/davhoods007 [link] [comments]

FRIDAY CALL TO ACTION: We need your help in Michigan Reddit!

Ok Reddit, Grassroots Leadership in Michigan is making our final push to put pressure on our Superdelegates to vote along with their constituents who chose Sanders over Hillary. At the very least, we are asking them to pledge to vote proportionally with our state's voters. Right now, we are not getting much reception from them, so we need SandersforPresident to give our Superdelegates the Reddit Hug of Death, flooding all of their offices with calls on Friday, the 25th of March (today). We need to put the pressure in advance for the Saturday, April 2nd Superdelegate Meeting at the Greektown Casino in Detroit. This meeting IS open to the public, and we're looking to flood it with Sanders supporters, so if you live in Michigan, or even nearby Toledo, mark April 2nd at 10 am off on your calendar to stand with us. We are looking for 500 - 1000 Bernie Supporters to show up and demand that our Superdelegates stand with their constituents. We'll post more instruction on this in /Michigan4Sanders next week!
Here's the phone script and the phone numbers. Please call as many as you can (or all of them for super awesome bonus points;). We put all of their numbers so that if the line you call is busy, you can call another office.
Script for calling offices of Super Delegates
Hi I’m calling to leave an opinion for (Insert Super Delegate name here). Michigan Grassroots for Bernie has created a pledge for all 17 Michigan Superdelegates to sign saying they commit to casting their Superdelegate vote at the convention in Philadelphia in July for whichever democratic candidate has more pledged delegates after the primaries are finished. I think it’s important for the American people to decide who the nominee is rather than a few party officials. For more info about the pledge or in order to sign it you can contact the Michigan Grassroots for Bernie leaders who will be also be contacting your office and leaving their information for you. I hope that in the interest of a fair and Democratic Party nomination process you decide to sign this pledge.
(If you’re not from Michigan or even the area the superdelegate you’re calling represents DO NOT LEAVE ANY PERSONAL OR CONTACT INFO. Feel free to leave this info if you live in the area they represent, but don’t feel obligated to.
These are the Superdelegates we are focusing on today while we hammer down the contact info for the remaining Superdelegates.
Debbie Stabenow: Senior Senator Lansing: 517-203-1760 Grand Rapids: 616-975-0052 Flint: 810-720-4172 Traverse City: 231-929-1031 Detroit: 313-961-4330 Marquette: 906-228-8756 Washington D.C: 202-224-4822
Gary Peters: Junior Senator Detroit: 313-226-6020, Lansing: 517-377-1508 Grand Rapids: 616-233-9150 Rochester: 248-608-8040 Saginaw: 989-754-0112 Traverse City: 231-947-7773 Washington D.C: 202-224-6221
Brenda Lawrence: 14th District Rep Washington D.C.: 202-225-5802 Detroit: 313-423-6183 Southfield: 248-356-2052
Dan Kildee 5th District Rep Washington D.C.: 202-225-3611 Flint: 810-238-8627 Campaign: 810-309-9027
Debbie Dingell: 12th District Rep Washington D.C.: 202-225-4071 Dearborn: 313-278-2936 Ypsilanti: 734-481-1100
John Conyers: 13th District Rep Washington D.C.: 202-225-5126 Detroit: 313-961-5670 Westland: 734-675-4084
Sander Levin: 9th District Rep Washington D.C.: 888-810-3880 Washington D.C. General: 202-225-4961 Michigan Office: 586-498-7122
Nancy Quarles: Oakland County Commissioner General Office: 248-858-0100
submitted by MiShirtGuy to Michigan4Sanders [link] [comments]

Come on Detroit, Get it Together

I'm not from Detroit, I'm from the suburbs. But, I am emotionally invested in Detroit and its success.
I travel to the city often for entertainment. In the last few weeks I've been to the Renaissance Center, the River Walk, Greektown Casino, Coaches Corner, Green Dot Stables, Hard Rock Cafe, Magee's Sporintg House Whiskey Bar, Campus Martius Park...
Last night was set to be great! 2 Tickets to watch /Detroitcityfc take on the Fort Pitt Regiment at Cass Tech.
Dinner at Green Dot? Wow! The place is packed, 40 minute wait; no time to eat before the game so we're off to Foran's Grand Trunk Pub on Woodward. The place is hoppin', but unlike Green Dot, there's 1 table open! Great dinner. Chips and guacamole, a patty melt and Better Made Chips and MI Beers. Mmmm.... beer.
Off to the game! We found parking pretty close actually, which was nice. Walked in right after the start of the match. The place is a sell out! Over 3,300 people! This is not my first DCFC game, I've been to about 10 of them. But, this is the first time with over 3,000 people there. The atmosphere is amazing! The Northern Guard was in good form. The other fans were getting in on the action too. The boys went down 1-0 in the first half, but rallied back with 3 2nd half goals to win. And, you really could not have asked for much better weather. So far, a perfect evening.
We hear that people will be headed over to McShane's Irish Pub & Whiskey Bar after the game. We figure it sounds like a good time, so we head straight there from Cass Tech.
There's not a lot of parking on Michigan Ave., so we park at Onassis Coney Island across the street and walk to McShane's.
We hung out there with the soccer (and some softball folks) crowd for a little while, then prepare to head home. It wasn't until we started driving that I noticed this.
A perfectly good night, tainted. Not ruined, but definitely tainted. If the city wants to entice people from the suburbs to come in, hang out, spend money and stay for a while, then things like this need to stop. Sure, all big cities have similar issues, I know. I've lived in Chicago and Pittsburgh, and this could happen easily in either city. It's the frequency with which things happen in Detroit that make it so concerning.
I can go to Chicago or Pittsburgh and have a pretty reasonable expectation that no one will vandalize my car, rob me or harass me. I feel relatively safe, all things considered, in the those cities. Heavy police force, lots of commerce and plenty of lit parking add to the sense of security. But, Detroit doesn't have that.
Things are dark and few and far between. Between dinner, the DCFC game and post-game cocktails, I had to re-park my car each time. You can't really walk between the venues. There is no lit parking, even when there's park at all. Aside from the 5 DPS Police Officers inside the actual field the only other Officer we ran into all night was 1 guy on a bike at Campus Martius.
They city needs to help itself. Welcome suburbanites. Welcome tourists. Welcome gamblers. Welcome business people spending time in the city. WE WANT TO BE IN THE CITY! Don't make it a hostile place, make it a place that people want to visit and spend their money. Don't make the few of us who actually go there feel like we're braving the city and acting like we must overcome the nonsense to help Detroit drag itself out of its funk. Because there's lots of entertaining things going on in Plymouth, Royal Oak, Birmingham, Novi, Northville, Livonia, etc. We don't need to come to the city! We come because we want to see it succeed. We come because we want Detroit thrive.
Sigh... Come on Detroit, Get it Together.
submitted by ohthereyouare to Detroit [link] [comments]

2013 Detroit Marathon

[Note: I was searching this subreddit to see if anyone had raced my upcoming marathon before, and there were no entries. Then I was surprised to find no one had done a write-up on Detroit, which is a pretty big marathon. Accordingly, here's mine; I hope runners considering Detroit will find it useful in the future!]
Getting to the starting line: Parking was pretty decent for such a large event. The maps they had at the expo helpfully pointed out a number of lots, all very close to the start. I was arriving a bit on the late side, but I still made it with plenty of time parking at one of the casinos and jogging over. Large searchlights made it pretty clear, even in the dark of night, where the race began.
The starting corrals were easy to navigate and well-marked. I entered directly at my lettered corral, but I'm pretty sure they were less "corrals" than "pretty please stand around X area."
The course itself
Segment 1: To and on the Ambassador Bridge Miles 1-4
The race starts off with a completely straight mile and a half to the entrance of the Ambassador Bridge. There's a lot of crowd support for the first half of this segment. I expected the on-ramp to the bridge to be steep and the bridge to be fairly flat; the opposite was closer to true. The on-ramps are more gentle than you might expect, and the bridge has a pretty pronounced crown at the midspan.
The bridge is fairly narrow (one lane reserved for emergency vehicles), so there's some bottlenecking. Also, if you are around the 8:00 pace, there's extra bottlenecking caused by people in the handcycle/disability division struggling up the hill. They do a good job marking these people with flags / support bikers, but you should be aware of them. They're much faster than runners everywhere else, but hills look like they're just murder on one of those things.
Lots of people like to start the marathon a bit slower for the first few miles. The course layout really helps you with that here! I, and many others, picked it up starting with the downhill segment of the bridge.
Some people might wonder about the international aspect of the race--do you really need your passport? I really carried it, but at each international crossing, I didn't see a single person who had their bib visible get stopped. Only the idiots who somehow--despite about 50 border patrol officers screaming at everyone on the course to have their bib visible--managed to cover it up got stopped, and then only to see it.
Segment 2: Canada and the Windsor Tunnel Miles 4-8
There's pretty great crowd support across the Canadian river front. There's also the five mile mark, where you hit your first timing mat of the event (the live tracking worked for my friends for every mileage except 20, where, because this was my first marathon and I had been slightly ahead of pace, they feared the worst!).
These are easy miles--nice and flat, with lots of supporters.
When I reached the tunnel, I worried a little about air quality, but it turned out to be completely fine. It was a little on the warm side, frankly, but the air was great. The elevation change in the tunnel is very subtle (it's lowest in the middle of the river). It's not quite a full mile underwater, but please no one tell the organizers: they're very excited about having an underwater mile.
Segment 3: Downtown, Mexicantown, Corktown, Greektown Miles 9-14
There's fantastic crowd support when you get back from Canada, even if your morale suffers slightly from the sudden loss of access to affordable health insurance. But the crowds fade quickly by mile 9. Miles 9 through 11 are fairly quiet, with a decent number of turns. The scenery through here is sometimes sad, with abandoned buildings dotting these neighborhoods.
Once you hit mile 12, however, you're back on Michigan Ave, and cruising toward downtown with increasing crowd support. The half-marathon runners turn off right before mile 13, but a new batch starts up--there are both "international" and "domestic" half-marathoners, so you always have fresh legs with you (although it looks like next year the domestic half will start much later, so they may not be around yet).
Segment 4: Solitude and Indian Village Miles 14-19
The run down miles 14-16 really could test your mettle. There's no one out there except the cops at the intersections (and sparsely staffed aid stations). It is a long, straight shot down a mediocre street. If you can zone out and just let the miles flow, this is the time to do it.
Miles 16 through 18 take you through "Indian Village," which is a much nicer area. There are pretty large homes on tree-lined streets, with a very pleasant atmosphere. There are a decent number of supporters out there (not crowds, but clumps of people) who are very enthusiastic. Some even offer beer! There's also a Gu station right at the beginning of this neighborhood.
The 19th mile leads you to back to the riverfront, where you get ready for...
Segment 5: Belle Isle to the Finish Miles 20-finish
The run out to Belle Isle is another mental challenge. You've finished 19 miles by the time you reach the bridge, but you can start to see other people already leaving the island. It's a bit of a gut punch, but the bridge and island themselves are beautiful. There aren't any crowds--it's an island, and the only bridge is devoted to the marathon course--but it's a pleasant atmosphere.
One of the aid stations on the island offered vaseline, which I don't think was listed on the website.
By the time you've finished mile 23, you're back across the bridge, on your way to a section of the Riverwalk. The course is a bit tight here, which is probably fine--it's not very crowded at this point. From miles 24 to the finish there's pretty strong crowd support, and the route is generally pretty straight and fast.
The one notable exception is a crime committed by the race organizers, placing the 26th mile marker at the top of a small (but at this point ENORMOUS) hill. A quick left turn and you can see the finish, but that hill is just plain mean.
Overall, I would recommend Detroit to someone running their first marathon, or any other marathon. It's a generally nice course, very well organized, and the international aspect is novel and fun.
submitted by contyg to Raceit [link] [comments]

Mark Wahlberg to open first Michigan Wahlburgers in Greektown

This is an automatic summary, original reduced by 57%.
DETROIT, MI - Mark Wahlberg is bringing his popular burger chain, Wahlburgers, to Michigan with the first location to open in Greektown in Downtown Detroit.
Exact location:The celebrity-owned burger restaurant and bar will be located at 569 Monroe Street in Detroit's historic Greektown Entertainment District.
The first Wahlburgers in Michigan will open the summer of 2016 at 569 Monroe Street in Detroit's historic Greektown Entertainment District.
"Mark Wahlberg's nationally recognized burger place, Wahlburgers, is the latest in a long line of unique restaurants to land in downtown Detroit over the last couple of years," said Mark Dunkeson, president and chief operating officer of JACK Entertainment LLC, Greektown Casino-Hotel's corporate gaming affiliate.
"They're perfect for Greektown in the heart of downtown Detroit."
Edward Pevos is the entertainment reporter for Mlive covering Detroit and Southeast Michigan.
Summary Source | FAQ | Theory | Feedback | Top five keywords: DETROIT#1 Greektown#2 burger#3 Entertainment#4 Mark#5
NOTICE: This thread is for discussing the submission topic only. Do not discuss the concept of the autotldr bot here.
submitted by autotldr to autotldr [link] [comments]

Did you know that Detroit is fine, has no crime, jobs, or neighborhood-blight issues? At least, that's what its meticulously edited wikipedia pages say.

The main Detroit wikipedia page briefly mentions:
Between 2000 and 2010, the city's population declined by 25%.[14] Among major American cities during the decade, only New Orleans experienced a greater decrease by percentage.[14]
But there's no mention of any real issues with the economy. This is the closest the main Detroit page gets to that:
The Detroit automakers and local manufacturing have made significant restructurings in response to market competition.
There's some mention of issues hitting Detroit in the Urban Development in Detroit page. But links to that page have been scrubbed from any other Detroit-related page (seriously, check the edit histories).
Ok, so maybe changes to Detroit belong in the History of Detroit page? Well, that page is pretty clean, as well.
Here's the entire Recent Developments Section of the History of Detroit page. This is the only section (except for a very brief blurb in the "Metropolitan Region" section right above it) that mentions events from 2000-Present:
In the 1990s, the city began to experience a revival, much of it centered in Downtown, Midtown, and New Center. One Detroit Center (1993) arose on the city skyline. In the ensuing years, three casino resort hotels opened in Detroit: MGM Grand Detroit, MotorCity Casino, and Greektown Casino which then debuted as resort hotels in 2007-08. New downtown stadiums Comerica Park and Ford Field were constructed for the Detroit Tigers and Detroit Lions in 2000 and 2002, respectively; this placed the Lions' stadium in the city proper for the first time since 1974. In 2008, the city witnessed major restorations of the historic Book Cadillac Hotel and the Fort Shelby Hotel.[26] The city has hosted major events - the 2005 MLB All-Star Game, 2006 Super Bowl XL, 2006 World Series, WrestleMania 23 in 2007 and the NCAA Final Four in April 2009 - all of which prompted many improvements to the area.
The city's International Riverfront is a focus of much development which has complemented similar developments in Windsor, Ontario. In 2007, Detroit completed the first major portions of the River Walk, including miles of parks and fountains. New developments and revitalizations are a mainstay in the city's plan to enhance its economy through tourism.[27] Along the river, upscale condominiums are rising, such as Watermark Detroit. Some city limit signs, particularly on the Dearborn border say "Welcome to Detroit, The Renaissance City Founded 1701".[26] [28]
The 2004 opening of the Compuware Center gave downtown Detroit its first significant new office building in a decade. Significant landmarks such as the Fox Theatre, Detroit Opera House, and the Gem Theater have been restored and host concerts, musicals, and plays. Many downtown centers such as Greektown, Cobo Center and Campus Martius Park, as well as the Michigan State Fairgrounds on the northern border, draw patrons and host activities.
See, we're all wrong. Detroit is a thriving, beautiful city with no real issues facing it. If you thought different, you're wrong and if you edit the pages to reflect that, someone will come and revert/change your edits.
TL;DR: It looks like Detroit is paying people to alter its wikipedia pages to put a positive spin on its current and/or recent history.
submitted by a_random_username to reddit.com [link] [comments]

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